Nutrition Archives - Proportion Foods
Proportion Foods - Nutrition for Active and Healthy Aging

Nutrition for Active and Healthy Aging

My title page contents

One more meal a day could save lives

Posted by ProPortion Foods Blog on Feb 14, 2019 in Aged Care, Malnutrition, Nutrition

Many older adults don’t eat enough to meet their nutritional needs, and this can impact their healing and recovery from injury.

 

In support of this, a 2-year pilot study has shown that giving one extra meal a day to older adults who were hospitalised with hip fractures halved their risk of dying.

 

The study, conducted by the NHS in the UK, was instigated after staff noticed that patients with hip fractures struggled to get enough nutrients. In the program, nutrition advisors across six sites brought food from the hospital’s canteen and sat with patients as they ate their extra meal.

 

As a result, mortality rates fell from 11 to 5.5 percent, and medical authorities are considering whether it should be introduced countrywide.

 

Often, busy staff overlook patients’ food intake, noted chief orthopaedic surgeon Dominic Inman. Commenting on the findings to The Telegraph, he said, “If you look upon food as a very, very cheap drug, that’s extremely powerful.”

 

 

A downward spiral

 

Hip fractures are the most common, and most serious type of fracture in Australia, with new fractures resulting in 50,900 hospitalisations and 579,000 bed days throughout 2015-16.

 

The health of adults over 50 often rapidly declines after a hip fracture, exacerbating poor outcomes. For three months after fracturing a hip, older adults are at five to eight times greater risk of dying, and one in three adults over 50 dies within 12 months.

 

Aside from that, a hip fracture can sorely impact mobility, independence and quality of life, and many patients are transferred to another facility for ongoing care.

 

 

On the bright side

 

Falls can be prevented by maintaining good muscle mass and strength. Failing that, patient outcomes after a fall can be improved with rehabilitation aimed at getting them moving as soon as possible, and with good nutrition.

 

Malnutrition, although widespread, is often overlooked, so it is important to be aware of the signs.

 

Addressing this, Queensland researchers have tested a patient-centred food service model in a public hospital setting and showed that it increased patients’ energy and protein intake – key requirements for healing and preventing malnourishment.

 

The model has been used in private acute care settings for 15 years. It revolves around providing room service to patients on demand – so they get to choose what they eat and when. (Who wants dinner at 5pm if you’re not ready for it?)

 

This food revolution was led by Sally McCray, who says, “This innovate model demonstrates the importance of patients being able to order flexibly, both in terms of the type of food items that patients feel like eating, as well as ordering food at a time of day that they feel like eating.”

 

The researchers showed that, not only can it improve nutrition intake, it also results in happier patients and reduced food waste.

 

 

References

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212267217305191

https://www.materonline.org.au/getattachment/Whats-On/News/July-2018/Mater-s-Dietetics-and-Food-Services-team-are-kicki/Public-hospital-research-paper.pdf

https://dietitianconnection.com/news/a-revolution-in-food-service-the-mater-room-service-model-part-1-of-2/

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6586215/Giving-elderly-patients-extra-meal-day-halve-chances-dying-hospital.html

https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/injury/hip-fracture-incidence-in-australia-2015-16/contents/summary

https://theconversation.com/why-hip-fractures-in-the-elderly-are-often-a-death-sentence-95784

 

Fine Food Australia highlights

Posted by ProPortion Foods Blog on Sep 24, 2018 in Nutrition

Every year, food operators including chefs, restauranteurs, café and bar owners gather to showcase new foods, tools of the trade, and industry insights. This year’s show in Melbourne was the biggest event yet.

 

Temptations from the recent food fest ranged from chocolate masterpieces by artistic chocolatier Stephane LeRoux and patisserie innovations to premium beer, wine and spirits and Peruvian superfoods like Camu Camu fruit and Sacha Inchi seeds.

 

 

ProPortion Foods

 

We presented a variety of possible ways to serve our portion-controlled cakes, from a tray display to plated up portions with garnishes and accompaniments.

 

The baked cheesecake was a big hit, with people coming back wanting more. We were delighted with compliments on the expert styling by My, and about how delicious our products are.

 

“It was great to catch up with our current suppliers and customers who stopped by to visit us at our stand, including interstate visitors,” says Nikki. “It’s always nice to be able to put a face to a name.”

 

 

And beyond…

 

Gluten-free products received less attention than in previous years, perhaps owing to their transition from a healthy living niche to mainstream fare. Their appeal has reached beyond people with allergens or intolerance as gluten-free fare has become part of a healthy lifestyle for many.

 

Hemp – the nutritious, protein-packed, non-psychoactive version – was one of the new kids on the block. Its nutty tasting seeds featured in many novel hemp-based products, owing to Australian legalisation last year that allowed it in foods.

 

“This is very exciting as it is a complete protein source with a natural health halo,” says Nikki. She thinks that we can expect to see more hemp protein powders, fortified foods and beverages.

 

Always fascinated to try new foreign foods and beverages, Nikki tried an animal from our own backyard in Australia: wallaby – grilled and as a “salami”.

 

“Less gamey than kangaroo, it has a soft texture similar to lamb,” she recalls. “A novelty taste testing, but I don’t think I’ll be eating it again.”

 

 

 

References

 

https://finefoodaustralia.com.au/

https://finefoodaustralia.com.au/about/

https://www.bakeryandsnacks.com/Article/2017/09/01/Gluten-free-surges-into-mainstream-despite-challenges

https://www.gizmodo.com.au/2018/01/2018s-biggest-health-fads-are-they-legit-or-nah/

The importance of mobility

Posted by ProPortion Foods Blog on Sep 21, 2018 in Mobility, Muscle, Nutrition

Jane is 52 years old. She suffers chronic neck pain and impaired mobility, resulting from an occupational violence attack. But she needs to continue her activities in the domestic domain and understands the importance of staying active despite the pain.

 

This is not easy. Although Jane’s house was designed for her ageing parents, the surrounding footpaths are dangerous, and she has already tripped a couple of times. Jane is also a quiet person who enjoys intimate social interactions in the comfort of her own home.

 

John is a socially and mentally active 44-year old who admits to mildly excessive alcohol consumption and periods of depression. He stays physically active to keep fit and get around.

 

With an aversion to driving, cycling is his preferred mode of transport. He hopes his physical health will allow him to continue. John lives close to a natural enjoyment which facilitates outdoor physical activities.

 

 

Mobility, independence and aging

 

As Jane and John age, mobility will become an increasingly important theme in their lives. Their independence will count on it.

 

A comprehensive survey of long-term studies covering 12.6 million older adults found that mobility improved quality of life and body function capacity and reduced medical expenditure.

 

Grocery shopping, housework, gardening, visiting friends and family, personal hygiene, going to appointments are things we take for granted. But impaired mobility and chronic conditions in aging can have a significant impact on these daily activities.

 

“Life space”, the space within which people move in their daily lives, impacts mobility – people who have restricted life space tend to be less mobile.

 

Walking is an activity that can easily be included in a daily routine as a form of transport to increase life space, thereby enhancing mobility and health.

 

John and Jane both identify Tai Chi as an activity that they could enjoy in 25 years. It is low impact, and as a bonus includes meditation and breathing for mental relaxation.

 

 

Lifestyle index

 

Global public health policies increasingly target healthy aging. To this end, a lifestyle index was developed to identify key factors related to aging well.

 

Core components of the index are vigorous and moderate physical activity, consuming fruit and vegetables, regular meals, plenty of fluids, and psychosocial factors – social engagement, networking and life satisfaction.

 

There is an interactive element to these. For instance, eating well reduces risk of overweight and chronic disease, both of which restrict mobility. Being socially active, like John, will enhance opportunities to be active.

 

In turn, higher mobility will enable greater engagement in social networks and activities.

 

Active aging policies could support people like Jane to be mobile by improving sidewalks and providing walking trails.

 

More broadly, policies across multiple sectors will empower older adults to remain independent, active community members – characteristic of a healthy, humane society.

 

 

References

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26152855

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1098301518301554

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5016728/

http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/67215/WHO_NMH_NPH_02.8.pdf;jsessionid=9191E64847E7A393A62232DFCAD25FA9?sequence=1

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/ageing-and-society/article/div-classtitlethe-association-of-mobility-limitation-and-social-networks-in-relation-to-late-life-activitydiv/D96AF570C1CB7DF3325E1A81E7C47C33

Banning junk food in hospitals

Posted by ProPortion Foods Blog on Aug 29, 2018 in Nutrition, Obesity

Although health is core business for hospitals, junk food and soft drinks have long dominated kiosks and vending machines that line hospital foyers and corridors.

 

But now Queensland is leading the way with a long overdue move to ban these items, which are driving contributors to obesity, poor health and chronic disease.

 

The ban is motivated by a call to reduce junk food advertising and availability to children. But other hospital goers will also benefit from moves to promote healthy food.

 

Obesity is a growing problem in older adults as well as children, and poor lifestyle choices promote higher risk of chronic diseases including Alzheimer’s.

 

 

Changing food environments

 

Making these changes is not easy. The food and drink industry, which has long enjoyed binding contracts with hospitals, has complained that it was not consulted in the decision.

 

Australian Beverages Council spokesperson, Geoff Parker, called the move “an insult to people’s intelligence,” arguing that “People don’t want governments snooping around in vending machines or hospital cafeterias.”

 

But the world’s leading obesity researchers say making unhealthy foods less available is needed to address the global health crisis. The ubiquity of food that is energy dense and nutritionally poor is a clear contributor to its overconsumption.

 

The executive summary of The Lancet’s 2015 obesity series argues that “Today’s food environments exploit people’s biological, psychological, social, and economic vulnerabilities, making it easier for them to eat unhealthy foods.

 

“This reinforces preferences and demands for foods of poor nutritional quality, furthering the unhealthy food environments.

 

“Regulatory actions from governments and increased efforts from industry and civil society will be necessary to break these vicious cycles.”

 

Targeting individual behaviours does not work, the researchers contend. They say a broad environmental focus on ‘denormalising’ unhealthy food consumption is needed – much like campaigns to reduce smoking.

 

That means changing social norms by creating an environment in which consuming unhealthy food and drinks becomes less attractive, less conventional and less accessible.

 

 

Does it work?

 

When trialled, healthier vending machine food and drink options have produced successful outcomes in schools, workplaces, hospitals and health services.

 

Evaluations of these initiatives not only reported that people bought healthier food items, but also that sales increased.

 

Behavioural economics tells us that people don’t necessarily make decisions based on careful weighing of risks and benefits. Behaviours are influenced by emotions, identity and environment – including the options available to us.

 

Based on this, contemporary research is considering how to ‘nudge’ people towards healthier behaviours and improve population health. When it comes to food, a grouped analysis of 42 trials in developed countries found that, on average, nudging strategies produced a 15.3% increase in healthier choices.

 

Healthier options in hospital vending machines and kiosks may not benefit the processed food and sugary drink industry, but people’s health and wellbeing could surely profit.

 

 

References

 

https://www.news.com.au/national/breaking-news/qld-leads-charge-on-junk-food-crackdown/news-story/e7020163b0c01c1a1a476f43e1a13d45

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-03/queensland-hospitals-to-ban-junk-food-and-sugary-drinks/10067928

https://www.thelancet.com/series/obesity-2015

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1446491/

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Branko_Cvjetan/publication/42833997_Healthier_vending_machines_in_workplaces_Both_possible_and_effective/links/55fe27fb08aeba1d9f6b4644/Healthier-vending-machines-in-workplaces-Both-possible-and-effective.pdf

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17341222

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4967524/

Page 1 of 7
1 2 3 7