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Nutrition for Active and Healthy Aging

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Consequences of malnutrition

Posted by ProPortion Foods Blog on Nov 15, 2019 in Malnutrition

Malnutrition can have dire consequences for an older person’s health”

–  Royal Commission into Aged Care Interim Report

 

20-65% of aged care residents are malnourished, and nearly 75% are at risk of malnourishment.

 

 

More than muscle

 

Loss of muscle mass and strength bear the brunt of poor nutrition, leading to frailty and sarcopenia, an age-related disease of accelerated muscle wasting that increases risk of falls and fractures, a prevalent problem that can spiral out of control with related complications.

 

Muscle mass comprises more than half of overall body tissue and its loss impacts not only physical strength and mobility but also muscles used by the lungs to breathe and by the heart to keep beating, escalating poor health and mortality. Low muscle mass has also been linked to other problems including increased risk of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

 

An unintentional loss of 15% body weight causes steep declines in muscle strength and lung function. If the loss reaches 23% this results in a further staggering 70% decrease in physical fitness, along with loss of muscle strength and increased depression risk.

 

These put a large strain on independence and quality of life, and the resulting fatigue and apathy create a vicious cycle, delaying recovery and exacerbating appetite loss.

 

Malnutrition also compromises the body’s immune system, increasing risk of infection and disease, delaying wound healing, causing complications and impeding general recovery. This results in being confined to bed for longer which also compounds the risk of pressure ulcers.

 

 

Report

Our Cost of Malnutrition report outlines the problem of malnutrition and its various costs – both financial and physical – and offers a guide to its identification and management.

 

Download your free report HERE

Health equality for Indigenous Australians still lagging dismally

Posted by ProPortion Foods Blog on Jul 22, 2019 in Cognition, Diabetes, Malnutrition, Nutrition, Obesity

In 2008 the Australian government released its Closing the Gap Strategy, which laid out plans to achieve health equality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people by 2030.

 

How is it tracking?

 

Not well, according to a 10-year review by the Australian Human Rights Commission – if anything, the gap has grown.

 

Of all Australian population groups, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people still suffer the worst health outcomes, and their lives are about 10 years shorter than the rest of the populace.

 

According to Robert Tickner from the Australian Red Cross, “It is a national disgrace that, despite our reputation as one of the world’s most bountiful food producers, so many Australians cannot get adequate, nutritious and affordable food.”

 

 

Diet and nutrition

 

Poor nutrition is a key contributor to the overburden of health issues faced by Indigenous Australians, which include overweight and obesity, malnutrition, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, chronic kidney disease and tooth decay.

 

These diseases contribute to at least three-quarters of their mortality gap.

 

Food insecurity is a big part of the problem. Much of this is due to poverty. Many Indigenous Australians also live in remote communities where healthy food is hard to come by. What is available is expensive because of transport costs.

 

As a result, fresh fruit and vegetable intake is very low, and “discretionary foods” make up 41 percent of their daily energy intake. Sugar consumption – largely from sweetened drinks – is nearly 50 percent more than the World Health Organisation’s recommendations.

 

Combined with easy access to unhealthy food and drinks, poor education and nutrition literacy is also part of the problem.

 

Many community-based programs have helped, the most successful being those with multi-level strategies that encourage community involvement at every stage of their development and implementation to make sure they are culturally appropriate and address local needs.

 

Some programs have focussed on improving the food supply through local retail outlets, school and community gardens, food provision by community organisations, and community store nutrition policies.

 

Nutrition education can also help, if delivered in conjunction with making healthy food accessible through cooking education, budgeting advice, and group-based lifestyle programs.

 

But these are band aid solutions to the overarching problem: there have been no nationally coordinated nutrition ventures since the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nutrition strategy and action plan expired in 2010.

 

 

A human right

 

The situation can be traced to many historical factors; indeed, all the evidence suggests that before European settlement Indigenous Australians enjoyed good health and a varied diet of nutritious fresh plant and animal foods.

 

Now they suffer socioeconomic disadvantage with low income and unemployment, institutional racism, low access to primary health care and poor quality, overcrowded housing, all of which contribute to ill-health and mortality.

 

Health equality is a basic human right. Treating diseases and improving nutrition and food security are important, but the review argues that underlying structural factors also need to be tackled before Australia can close the gap.

 

 

References

 

https://ruralhealth.org.au/partyline/article/major-review-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-nutrition

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4977265/

https://www.smh.com.au/national/aboriginal-malnourishment-a-national-disgrace-20081030-gdt0s8.html

https://www.acn.edu.au/nurseclick/aboriginal-torres-strait-islander-nutrition-alarmingly-poor-new-review-reports

https://www.humanrights.gov.au/our-work/aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-social-justice/publications/close-gap-10-year-review

The silent killer: 1 in 3 patients at risk of malnutrition

Posted by ProPortion Foods Blog on Feb 22, 2019 in Aged Care, Malnutrition, Research

One in three hospitalised adults in the US is at risk for malnutrition, a major analysis has found. And patients’ poor food intake is having a significant impact on their healing and recovery, compounding their risk of death.

 

“Nutrition is easily overlooked as healthcare professionals often focus on a patient’s primary diagnosis,” lead author Abby Sauer told NutritionInsight.

 

“It may come as a surprise to some that when patients don’t get proper nutrition, it can significantly put their health and lives at risk,” she adds, explaining that nutrition is more important than ever when someone is sick or injured.

 

 

The invisible malady

 

The researchers screened around 10,000 patients from 2009 to 2015 to assess malnutrition risk and links with mortality.

 

They found around one in two patients were eating half or less of their meals. This low food intake was linked to higher risk of mortality, and those who ate none of their food had a nearly six-fold higher risk of dying than those who ate at least some.

 

The findings support previous studies that have identified hospital malnutrition as a global public health problem, including Australian research which also found that this “silent epidemic” affects one in three hospitalised patients.

 

Despite this growing awareness, it is still not given the attention it deserves.

 

“Malnutrition can be invisible to the eye and is rampant in US hospitals because it’s not always top of mind,” said Gail Gerwitz, president of nutritionDay, an organisation which was involved in the study.

 

Loss of muscle mass and strength takes the brunt of poor nutrition, leading to sarcopenia, an age-related disease of accelerated muscle wasting that results in a downward spiral of poor health and mortality.

 

 

Taking action

 

Some Australian hospitals are taking action by implementing basic malnutrition and sarcopenia screening tools. Relatives can also look for key signs of malnutrition.

 

These include unexpected weight loss, tiredness, low mood, poor appetite, unhealthy teeth and gums, listless hair and brittle nails, constipation and poor wound healing.

 

Hospitals and aged care facilities can take several measures to boost patients’ food intake, by using patient-centred service models, introducing mandatory nutrition standards, addressing obstacles to eating like poor dentition, and providing a choice of meals that are tasty and appealing.

 

High protein, high energy meals are the first line of defence to prevent or address malnutrition and promote healing. This can be achieved by adding extra cream or butter to food. Where necessary – especially with poor appetite – supplements can be used between meals to boost protein and calorie intake.

 

 

 

 References

 

https://www.nutritioninsight.com/news/one-in-three-us-hospitalized-patients-at-risk-of-malnutrition-study-discovers.html

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/jpen.1499?referrer_access_token=YpyQjt0dEdDplln3sncQT04keas67K9QMdWULTWMo8NpaDOJGsSXE-fFRqzg6qmp4mwZgNSU9OHo5UV-WX36sAF2PuESP4p8o6p9TexcSSzwdzG5kvFYGDFA6MWvDsOp&

One more meal a day could save lives

Posted by ProPortion Foods Blog on Feb 14, 2019 in Aged Care, Malnutrition, Nutrition

Many older adults don’t eat enough to meet their nutritional needs, and this can impact their healing and recovery from injury.

 

In support of this, a 2-year pilot study has shown that giving one extra meal a day to older adults who were hospitalised with hip fractures halved their risk of dying.

 

The study, conducted by the NHS in the UK, was instigated after staff noticed that patients with hip fractures struggled to get enough nutrients. In the program, nutrition advisors across six sites brought food from the hospital’s canteen and sat with patients as they ate their extra meal.

 

As a result, mortality rates fell from 11 to 5.5 percent, and medical authorities are considering whether it should be introduced countrywide.

 

Often, busy staff overlook patients’ food intake, noted chief orthopaedic surgeon Dominic Inman. Commenting on the findings to The Telegraph, he said, “If you look upon food as a very, very cheap drug, that’s extremely powerful.”

 

 

A downward spiral

 

Hip fractures are the most common, and most serious type of fracture in Australia, with new fractures resulting in 50,900 hospitalisations and 579,000 bed days throughout 2015-16.

 

The health of adults over 50 often rapidly declines after a hip fracture, exacerbating poor outcomes. For three months after fracturing a hip, older adults are at five to eight times greater risk of dying, and one in three adults over 50 dies within 12 months.

 

Aside from that, a hip fracture can sorely impact mobility, independence and quality of life, and many patients are transferred to another facility for ongoing care.

 

 

On the bright side

 

Falls can be prevented by maintaining good muscle mass and strength. Failing that, patient outcomes after a fall can be improved with rehabilitation aimed at getting them moving as soon as possible, and with good nutrition.

 

Malnutrition, although widespread, is often overlooked, so it is important to be aware of the signs.

 

Addressing this, Queensland researchers have tested a patient-centred food service model in a public hospital setting and showed that it increased patients’ energy and protein intake – key requirements for healing and preventing malnourishment.

 

The model has been used in private acute care settings for 15 years. It revolves around providing room service to patients on demand – so they get to choose what they eat and when. (Who wants dinner at 5pm if you’re not ready for it?)

 

This food revolution was led by Sally McCray, who says, “This innovate model demonstrates the importance of patients being able to order flexibly, both in terms of the type of food items that patients feel like eating, as well as ordering food at a time of day that they feel like eating.”

 

The researchers showed that, not only can it improve nutrition intake, it also results in happier patients and reduced food waste.

 

 

References

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212267217305191

https://www.materonline.org.au/getattachment/Whats-On/News/July-2018/Mater-s-Dietetics-and-Food-Services-team-are-kicki/Public-hospital-research-paper.pdf

https://dietitianconnection.com/news/a-revolution-in-food-service-the-mater-room-service-model-part-1-of-2/

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6586215/Giving-elderly-patients-extra-meal-day-halve-chances-dying-hospital.html

https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/injury/hip-fracture-incidence-in-australia-2015-16/contents/summary

https://theconversation.com/why-hip-fractures-in-the-elderly-are-often-a-death-sentence-95784

 

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