January 2019 - Proportion Foods
Proportion Foods - Nutrition for Active and Healthy Aging

Nutrition for Active and Healthy Aging

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Dementia-related deaths are rising

Posted by ProPortion Foods Blog on Jan 30, 2019 in Aging, Cognition

Over the past decade, dementia has jumped from the fourth to the second leading cause of death in Australia – and for Australian women it has overtaken heart disease to become the top cause of death.

 

“With more than 436,000 Australians living with dementia and an estimated 1.45 million people involved in the care of someone with dementia, it is clearly one of the biggest public health challenges facing Australia,” said Maree McCabe, CEO of Dementia Australia.

 

McCabe highlights the urgent need for more investment into dementia awareness, research, treatment and care to address this major public health problem.

 

 

Not a normal part of aging

 

While memory and cognition decline with age – along with other physical faculties – dementia is not a normal part of aging.

 

Most common after the age of 65, dementia is a constellation of symptoms that affect brain function. It is a progressive disease with debilitating effects on thinking, memory, emotions, behaviour and ability to carry out daily activities.

 

Alzheimer’s disease is its most common form. Other versions include vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, Huntington’s disease, and alcohol-related dementia (Korsakoff’s syndrome – caused by vitamin B deficiency).

 

These all have different causes, and an early diagnosis is essential to try and identify if symptoms are treatable.

 

More importantly, many cases of dementia can be prevented.

 

 

Preventing dementia

 

It is estimated that a staggering one third to half of dementia cases can be prevented by changes in lifestyle behaviours – unhealthy habits that can slowly develop into dementia over an extended period of time.

 

A recent study conducted brain scans on 135 people over a 20-year period. Results showed that people with higher cholesterol had more white matter damage to the brain, suggesting poorer cognitive function and greater risk of dementia – independently of age, education and genetic dementia risk.

 

Lead researcher, Cassandra Szoeke, director of the Healthy Ageing Program at the University of Melbourne, says the effects are substantial, and are reinforced by another study that found the number of brain cells at age 50 can predict cognitive ability 10 years later.

 

Other new research that followed older adults for 15 years has shown that hardening of the arteries is a strong predictor of dementia risk.

 

These findings are consistent with studies showing that a healthy Mediterranean diet, high in plant foods and low in processed food, can lower risk of both heart disease and dementia.

 

Promising research also suggests that pine bark extract can help ameliorate cognitive decline via its antioxidant properties, and protein might also help prevent dementia.

 

Compelling evidence tells us that regular physical activity is an important way to stay physically and mentally healthy – even incidental daily activities and walking all add up.

 

And for people with dementia and restricted mobility, personalised exercise can also lift some of the burden, so it’s never too late to get moving.

 

 

 References

 

https://www.dementia.org.au/about-dementia/what-is-dementia

https://www.dementia.org.au/information/about-dementia/types-of-dementia

https://www.dementia.org.au/about-dementia/carers/later-stages-of-dementia

https://www.australianageingagenda.com.au/2018/09/28/deaths-from-dementia-on-the-rise/

https://www.dementia.org.au/media-releases/2018/dementia-as-second-leading-cause-of-death-of-all-australians-on-the-rise

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2017/sep/27/dementia-becomes-leading-cause-of-death-for-australian-women

https://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/health-and-wellness/new-research-shows-how-women-can-keep-their-brains-healthy-20181029-p50cly.html

https://www.australianageingagenda.com.au/2018/11/09/residents-more-likely-to-have-physical-disability-than-psychosocial-one/

 

 

Is plant protein as good for muscles as animal protein?

Posted by ProPortion Foods Blog on Jan 8, 2019 in Muscle, Protein

Animal protein – particularly whey powder – is popularly endorsed as the best source of amino acids for boosting muscle strength. But a closer look at the research suggests that plant proteins could be just as effective for building and maintaining lean muscle mass.

 

Whey protein contains more of the amino acid leucine than plant proteins. Extensive research shows that leucine activates muscle protein synthesis – i.e. helps muscle to use the protein. This is thought to explain its superior benefits for building lean muscle and strength after resistance training.

 

However, the evidence derives from studies of whey protein’s short-term impact over 3 to 4 hours. A recent meta-analysis combined nine studies that compared soy protein with various animal proteins over 6 weeks or more (5 studies tested whey and 4 used beef, milk or dairy protein).

 

Overall, the analysis found that combining protein supplementation with resistance training exercises (bench press and squat) increased muscle strength. But the effects of soy protein did not differ from whey powder or the other animal proteins.

 

Looking at whole dietary patterns, the Framingham Third Generation Study found last year that people with lower protein intakes had lower lean mass and muscle strength. But they also found no difference between the different types of protein.

 

According to Health.com, lead author Kelsey Mangano says, “As long as a person is exceeding the recommended daily allowance for protein, no matter the source in their diet, they can improve their muscle health.”

 

 

Why is muscle health important?

 

Losing muscle mass is one of the biggest health challenges of aging. Lean muscle does so much more than endow our bodies with a shapely physique.

 

Older adults need to maintain lean muscle mass to prevent falls, a major problem in aging that results in physical injury, reduced quality of life, and death.

 

Muscles store glucose to provide energy and can protect against diabetes and heart disease. Age-related loss of muscle mass can lead to sarcopenia, also associated with reduced quality of life, hospital admissions and chronic conditions like poor lung function and breast cancer risk.

 

 

Dietary protein

 

Proteins are made from 20 amino acids arranged in thousands of different combinations. Nine amino acids are “essential” – i.e. we need to get them through dietary sources.

 

Animal proteins include meat, fish, chicken, eggs, and dairy foods. Protein also derives from abundant plant foods including nuts, legumes, seeds, lentils, grains, and even hemp.

 

Most plant protein sources are incomplete – i.e. they don’t contain all essential amino acids. Proteins derived from animal sources are complete; hence animal protein was deemed to be superior.

 

However, eating combinations of plant sources provides a complete protein, and it’s now established that the body can store amino acids, so a whole amino acid contingent doesn’t need to be eaten in one meal.

 

Most importantly, regardless of the source, research suggests that older adults who eat 1 gram of protein per kg of body weight each day are less likely to suffer disability. Combining this with regular physical movement will yield the greatest benefits.

 

 

 

References

 

https://journals.humankinetics.com/doi/pdf/10.1123/ijsnem.2018-0071

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20181114/Soy-protein-equally-effective-as-animal-protein-in-building-muscle-strength.aspx

https://www.health.com/nutrition/vegetarian-protein-animal-protein-build-muscle

https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/105/3/714/4569695

https://sunshinecoastdietetics.com.au/complementary-proteins-and-how-they-work/